Podcast

 

Tape Log Index of Sound Bites

TRT (3:12)

Austin Yu   (0:23)

Emory University First-Year

John Wegner   (0:48)

Emory University Professor, Environmental Science

Ben Perlman   (1:25) and (1:51)

Director of the Dobbs University Center

John Wegner   (2:30)

Emory University Professor, Environmental Science

Ben Perlman   (2:49)

Director of the Dobbs University Center

Script

NAT SOUND (0:02)

REPORTER VOICER (0:21)

That’s the sound of construction on Emory University’s new Campus Life Center that will replace the current Dobbs University Center. The new building will be more efficient, effective, and user-friendly for the campus community. Many students have expressed concerns about the energy demands and general eco-friendliness of the current dining center. Austin Yu, a first-year at Emory, describes a fundamental flaw in the cooling system of the current building.

SOUNDBITE (0:13) Austin Yu, Emory University First-Year

What happens is since the air conditioning goes from the ceiling all the hot air rises to the top and all that the system is doing is essentially cycling that hot air without effectively distributing this conditioned air to the lower levels.

REPORTER VOICER (0:12)

Emory follows the LEED certification process during construction to address such concerns, and to measure the environmental impact of a building. Professor John Wegner, a senior lecturer in the Department of Environmental Science, explains the program.

SOUND BITE (0:17) John Wegner, Emory University Professor, Environmental Science

LEED, which stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design has a variety of categories under which you can get points, and then can be certified, Silver or Gold and Platinum. It was developed by the U.S. Green Building Council in the late 1990’s.

REPORTER VOICER (0:20)

Emory began using LEED in 2000, and has since been a leader in sustainable development, setting an example for universities worldwide. There are now over 25 LEED-certified buildings on campus, more than a dozen being Gold certified. Ben Perlman, the Director of the Dobbs University Center, describes how plans for the new Campus Life Center meet criteria for certification at the Silver level at a minimum.

SOUND BITE (0:12) Ben Perlman, Director of the Dobbs University Center

We’re very confident about the silver and the range that they’re projecting could even be Gold but we don’t know what we’ll get in terms of building performance until we build the building. And a lot of those extra points that you need to get to LEED Gold are related to those things that are unknown until you do it.

REPORTER VOICER (0:14)

Efforts to reduce energy consumption by the new Campus Life Center will also help Emory achieve its goal of decreasing its carbon footprint. Perlman describes how plans for the building rely on utilization of renewable sources of energy that will allow the building to be close to zero energy usage.

SOUND BITE (0:28) Ben Perlman, Director of the Dobbs University Center

Georgia is a one hundred percent coal burning state. You can’t buy wind or solar from Georgia power if you wanted to. And so while we are doing some things that will help us achieve LEED Silver we’re actually going much farther in that area. We are doing pretty ambitious stuff, like the idea that you feed the air conditioning from the bottom instead of the top. We will be installing solar photovoltaic cells on the roof that will heat all non-cooking water to the appropriate temperature. We’re also doing geothermal energy off of McDonough Field.

REPORTER VOICER (0:11)

Implementing sustainable practices are essential if Emory is going to meet its goals for energy reduction. But these initiatives do not come without a price. Professor Wegner shares the biggest issue inhibiting more of these advances.

SOUND BITE (0:08) John Wegner, Emory University Professor, Environmental Science

Cost, the biggest issue is cost, and unfortunately, some aspects of designing sustainably cost more upfront.

REPORTER VOICER (0:10)

The challenge is balancing costs and benefits to advantage both the university and the environment. Perlman describes the benefit of investing in energy initiatives now to outset later costs.

SOUND BITE (0:12) Ben Perlman, Director of the Dobbs University Center

Building Geothermal is really expensive at the outset, but you’ll save so much money in energy that you’ll pay it off in five or ten years. Emory is very fortunate, privileged really, to be able to think okay well let’s spend now because the long-term savings are huge.

REPORTER VOICER (0:11)

Here at Emory we are very fortunate to be part of a university that is being environmentally responsible and creating a more sustainable future for its members.

TAG: Katelyn Boisvert, Emory University


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